Archive for the ‘Interlitq’ Tag

“Roth’s personal life afforded him little serenity, but his achievement in the 1980s and after represents one of the most remarkable creative moments in American literature”

Philip Roth

Eric Homberger writes:

Roth’s personal life afforded him little serenity, but his achievement in the 1980s and after represents one of the most remarkable creative moments in American literature. He staked a claim as a postmodernist in The Counterlife (1986) and Operation Shylock. But it was the exuberant, transgressive Mickey Sabbath, a maestro at loss and humiliation, and a sumo wrestler with death in Sabbath’s Theater (1995), who showed Roth to be a writer of a poignant humanity.

In American Pastoral, which won the Pulitzer prize in 1997, I Married a Communist and The Human Stain (2000), Roth engaged with American politics for the first time since his roasting of Nixon in Our Gang in 1971. In theory an upper West Side liberal, who had always voted for the Democrats, Roth declined to fit himself into predictable categories, liberal or otherwise.

One of his strongest motives for continuing to write fictions, he noted in Reading Myself and Others (1975), a collection of autobiographical essays, “is an increased distrust of ‘positions’, my own included”. He explored the unhealed scars of the Newark race riot of the 1960s in American Pastoral. In the character Swede Levov he created an American innocent, destroyed by the political wildness of that decade. But it was Levov’s daughter Merry, holed up in a Newark slum after committing a terrorist bombing, who gave American Pastoral its prophetic weight.

In I Married a Communist Roth explored themes of betrayal in the heyday of Popular Front leftism and McCarthyism. The Human Stain, awarded the Prix Médicis Étranger in 2002, was set in the year the House Republicans impeached Bill Clinton. In it, Roth explored transgression, and its endless consequences. An uttered impropriety (the word “spooks”) destroys Coleman Silk, a black classicist “passing” as a Jew, who is hounded out of his job, his reputation shredded.

Philip Roth, U.S. author, dies aged 85

Philip Roth was presented with the National Humanities Medal by then President Barack Obama in 2011

One of the great American authors, Philip Roth, has died aged 85.

The Pulitzer, National Book Award and Man Booker International Prize-winning novelist’s work drew its inspiration from Jewish family life, sex and American ideals.

His works included American Pastoral, I Married a Communist and Portnoy’s Complaint.

The New York Times reported that a close friend of Roth’s said he had died of congestive heart failure.

Roth first found success with his short story collection, Goodbye Columbus, published in 1959.

A decade later his sexually explicit novel Portnoy’s Complaint catapulted him to notoriety, making him a celebrity in the US.

In later life, he wrote a number of highly regarded historical novels, including his 1997 work American Pastoral, for which he won his Pulitzer.

He wrote prolifically over the course of his career, publishing more than 30 books before ending his fiction career in 2009.

When Roth won the 2011 Man Booker International, chairman of the judges Rick Gekoski said: “His career is remarkable in that he starts at such a high level, and keeps getting better.

“In his 50s and 60s, when most novelists are in decline, he wrote a string of novels of the highest, enduring quality.”

He also recognised that Roth’s win divided the Man Booker International panel, and had caused one judge to quit in protest.

“I can recall few of his novels that don’t provoke an occasional but overwhelming desire to shout ‘Will you shut up!’ at a character or his author,” he said.

Peter Robertson’s translation of Gustavo Bossert’s story “El Altar” (“The Altar”) published in Interlitq

Gustavo Bossert

Peter Robertson‘s translation of Gustavo Bossert‘s story “El Altar” (“The Altar”) is published in Interlitq.

About Gustavo Bossert

About Peter Robertson

Read Peter Robertson‘s translation of Gustavo Bossert‘s story “HOTEL”, published in Interlitq

César Aira: “En el caso de Alejandra fue un poco un deseo de hacerle justicia”

César Aira

En una entrevista con Francisco Marzioni (Infobae), César Aira opina:

En el caso de Alejandra fue un poco un deseo de hacerle justicia, porque a partir de su muerte -e incluso desde antes- se la trató siempre en términos metafóricos, “la niña angustiada”, “la pequeña sonámbula en la cornisa de la angustia”, y yo que sé. Bueno, bajar el tono de eso, ir a los textos, mostrar la extraordinaria poeta que fue, de dónde salió su poesía, tratarla sensatamente, sin metáforas, sin sentimentalismo y sin patetismo, y de ahí que las pizarnikianas me odien sin cordialidad porque para ellas la pequeña sonámbula y la pequeña náufraga y todo eso sigue vigente y que alguien hable en otros términos… en fin.

Patricio Leone: “A veces el Psicoanálisis no sirve y tomas herramientas de la Sistémica, y tampoco sirve y tomas herramientas de la Cognitiva…”

Patricio Leone

Patricio Leone opina:

“El grupo me enseñó cuestiones legales, clínicas, académicas. Hoy no me considero ni psicoanalista, ni sistémico, ni cognitivo. No sé lo que soy, lo digo con un poco de pesar pero con orgullo, porque como no sé, puedo tomar de todas las corrientes, mi visión de la Psicología es que el norte sea mi paciente, no una orientación.

A veces el Psicoanálisis no sirve y tomas herramientas de la Sistémica, y tampoco sirve y tomas herramientas de la Cognitiva, y soy tan así que tengo un grupo de anti fans, un grupo de Cognitivos que me juegan en contra porque dicen que rechazo al Psicoanálisis; otro grupo porque soy Psicoanalista y dicen que rechazo a los Cognitivos.

Esto tiene que ver con la capacidad de integrar, lo digo humildemente, para a mí es el camino a seguir, no me voy a embanderar con ninguna corriente. La especie humana quiere etiquetar, quiere que tengas un rótulo, y si me queres etiquetar soy psicólogo, soy docente, soy runner, y soy trotskista, esas son mis etiquetas. Empecé siendo psicoanalista y ahora necesito de otras corrientes.”

Lee toda la entrevista con Patricio Leone (hecho por Yamila Musa, Editor de Argentina de Interlitq)