Archive for the ‘New York Bulletina’ Category

Using DNA to Fight Dog Owners’ Discourtesy in Brooklyn: Ginia Bellafante

Bella, left, and Luka are among about 175 dogs living at One Brooklyn Bridge Park. Credit Nicole Craine for The New York Times

Bella, left, and Luka are among about 175 dogs living at One Brooklyn Bridge Park. Credit Nicole Craine for The New York Times

Ginia Bellafante writes:

On a frigid Wednesday evening in January, 40 residents of One Brooklyn Bridge Park, a condominium complex converted from an old printing factory on the Brooklyn Heights waterfront, gathered at Wag Club, a dog grooming and training service on the ground floor, to discuss an issue that had been stirring tensions in the building. Dispersed among the 440 or so apartments are about 175 dogs of varying sizes, breeds and dispositions. As it happened, some of their owners had been behaving badly.

Something had to be done, but what precisely? For some time, dog waste had been a persistent problem, especially during inhospitable weather, when people were allowing their pets to relieve themselves in stairwells and corridors.

Manhattan Judge Orders Psychiatric Test for Man Accused of Killing His Wealthy Father

Thomas Gilbert Jr.

Thomas Gilbert Jr.

A judge on Friday ordered a psychiatric examination for a man charged with murdering his wealthy father, a Manhattan hedge fund manager, during an argument over money.

The man, Thomas Gilbert Jr., 30, a Princeton graduate, avid surfer and bon vivant who was living off his father’s largess before the killing, nodded eagerly as Justice Melissa Jackson of State Supreme Court urged him to cooperate with forensic psychiatrists.

Mr. Gilbert’s lawyer, Alex Spiro, told the judge his client was too mentally disturbed to play a role in his own defense.

“My client has a long history of psychiatric issues and we believe at this time he is not competent,” Mr. Spiro told reporters after the court appearance in Manhattan. He declined to give details.

Prosecutors said Mr. Gilbert shot his father, Thomas Gilbert Sr., on Jan. 4 at point-blank range inside his parent’s apartment at 20 Beekman Place. He had arrived at the apartment around 3:15 p.m., asking his mother to leave him alone with his father. A neighbor heard a gunshot a few minutes later, and the son was seen leaving the building.

Mr. Gilbert was found on his back in the bedroom, with a head wound, a gun on his chest and his left hand covering it. Detectives regarded the scene as a clumsily staged suicide.

Secret Grand Jury Testimony From Ethel Rosenberg’s Brother Is Released

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg during their 1951 trial  in New York. They were convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage – the government claimed they had stolen the secret to the atomic bomb and all but triggered the Korean War. Credit Associated Press

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg during their 1951 trial in New York. They were convicted of conspiracy to commit espionage – the government claimed they had stolen the secret to the atomic bomb and all but triggered the Korean War. Credit Associated Press

Sam Roberts writes:

More than six decades later, the prosecution of Ethel Rosenberg remains one of America’s most controversial criminal cases: Her conviction — and eventual execution — for joining in her husband Julius’s espionage conspiracy rested largely on trial testimony from her younger brother.

But in private testimony to a grand jury seven months before the 1951 trial, Mrs. Rosenberg’s brother, David Greenglass, never mentioned involvement by his sister in Mr. Rosenberg’s delivery of atomic secrets to Soviet operatives, according to a grand jury transcript released Wednesday.

While not definitive proof that he lied at trial, Mr. Greenglass’s omission — and his assertion before the grand jury that he had never even discussed espionage with his sister — provides further evidence to Mrs. Rosenberg’s defenders who believe that she was unfairly convicted, and that her brother, under pressure from prosecutors, had doomed her with concocted testimony to spare his own wife from prosecution.

Public Urination in New York Becomes Test Case for Policing

The police often issue citations to people urinating in alleys off a bar-studded strip on Roosevelt Avenue in Queens. Credit Kevin Hagen for The New York Times

The police often issue citations to people urinating in alleys off a bar-studded strip on Roosevelt Avenue in Queens. Credit Kevin Hagen for The New York Times

Matt Flegenheimer and J. David Goodman write:

Evidence pools beneath rows of pay phones, between parked cars, outside bars where last call has come and gone.

The culprits can be found in any neighborhood of New York City: the West Village or Williamsburg, Chelsea or Elmhurst. And teams of plainclothes police officers, unsympathetic to the urge, know where to lie in wait. Sometimes.

“This is tradition,” Alejandro Gomez, 31, said recently from a bench in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where he shared a six-pack with two friends who rose to urinate, undetected, beside a park around 2 a.m.

As city leaders wrestle with how to adapt police tactics to a lower-crime era, the Police Department in recent months has suggested it would loosen its approach to public urination, a quintessential quality-of-life crime whose effects have a tendency to linger — both on the street and for the person cited.

Skeptics have bemoaned any proposed shift as an emblem of backslide after decades of aggressive policing. But Commissioner William J. Bratton, in a May letter to the City Council, said he was open to treating the offense as a violation only, rather than a misdemeanor, so long as officers preserved the right to make an arrest if necessary.

NEW YORK CITY HOSTING ITS FIRST DISABILITY PRIDE PARADE

Mayor Bill de Blasio plans to speak Sunday afternoon at the inaugural NYC Disability Pride Parade.

The parade route begins at Manhattan’s Madison Square Park and continues along Broadway to Union Square Park.

July is designated as “Disability Pride Month” in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act that aims to guarantee equal opportunities and rights for people with disabilities.

The city has planned a monthlong series of events relating to New Yorkers with disabilities. That includes an exhibit at the Brooklyn Historical Society titled “Gaining Access: The New York City Disability Rights Movement.”