Archive for the ‘Mathematics’ Category

Lewis Carroll, English author, was born today in history: 27 January, 1832

Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll

Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (/ˈɑrlz ˈlʌtwɪ ˈdɒdsən/; 27 January 1832 – 14 January 1898), better known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll (/ˈkærəl/), was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem Jabberwocky, and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world (including the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and New Zealand) dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life.

Jacob Bronowski died on this day in history: 22 August, 1974

Jacob Bronowski

Jacob Bronowski

Jacob Bronowski (18 January 1908 – 22 August 1974) was a Polish-Jewish British mathematician, biologist, historian of science, theatre author, poet and inventor. He is best remembered as the presenter and writer of the 1973 BBC television documentary series, The Ascent of Man, and the accompanying book.

Paraguay legalized homosexuality 87 years before the UK

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In 1952, Alan Mathison Turing, the British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, computer scientist and philosopher was convicted for homosexuality, illegal in the UK until 1967, before committing suicide on this day in history, 7 June, 1954.

Alan Turing

Alan Turing

 

Queen Elizabeth II gave royal pardon to Alan Turing, convicted for homosexuality

Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II gave a royal pardon to Alan Mathison Turing, the British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, computer scientist and philosopher who was convicted for homosexuality, and who committed suicide on this day in history, 7 June, 1954.

Alan Turing

Alan Turing

Alan Turing, persecuted for his homosexuality, committed suicide on this day in history: 7 June, 1954

Alan Turing

Alan Turing

Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (/ˈtjʊərɪŋ/ TEWR-ing; 23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was a British mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, computer scientist and philosopher. He was highly influential in the development of computer science, providing a formalisation of the concepts of “algorithm” and “computation” with the Turing machine, which can be considered a model of a general purpose computer. Turing is widely considered as the “Father of Theoretical Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence.

During World War II, Turing worked for the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) at Bletchley Park, Britain’s codebreaking centre. For a time he led Hut 8, the section responsible for German naval cryptanalysis. He devised a number of techniques for breaking German ciphers, including improvements to the pre-war Polish bombe method, an electromechanical machine that could find settings for the Enigma machine.

After the war, he worked at the National Physical Laboratory, where he designed the ACE, among the first designs for a stored-program computer. In 1948 Turing joined Max Newman‘s Computing Laboratory at Manchester University, where he assisted development of the Manchester computers and became interested in mathematical biology. He wrote a paper on the chemical basis of morphogenesis, and predicted oscillating chemical reactions such as the Belousov–Zhabotinsky reaction, first observed in the 1960s.

Turing was prosecuted for homosexuality in 1952, when such acts were still criminalised in the UK. He accepted treatment with estrogen injections (chemical castration) as an alternative to prison. Turing died in 1954, 16 days before his 42nd birthday, from cyanide poisoning. An inquest determined his death a suicide; his mother and some others believed it was accidental. On 10 September 2009, following an Internet campaign, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown made an official public apology on behalf of the British government for “the appalling way he was treated.” The Queen granted him a posthumous pardon on 24 December 2013.