Archive for the ‘Islam’ Category

6 Rules Of Islamophobia In America

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Christopher Mathias writes:

After the 2015 terror attack in Paris, when Donald Trump and other GOP presidential candidates were ratcheting up their anti-Muslim political speech, we started a running list of Islamophobic acts. Sadly, in less than two months, the list became so long the webpage often wouldn’t load.

This made us recognize the very real surge in anti-Muslim incidents sweeping the nation — a surge many wanted to deny was happening at all. (Think Fox News host Eric Bolling saying he “hadn’t heard of any” anti-Muslim hate crimes.)

So we developed The Islamophobia Project, and committed to tracking anti-Muslim violence, vandalism, discrimination, public policy and political speech throughout 2016.

The timing of the incidents we collected helped reveal patterns. We discovered that Trump supporters attacked, harassed, or plotted to kill Muslims at least 13 times during the election cycle, proving a potential link between Trump’s rhetoric and the actions of supporters. We documented apparent surges in anti-Muslim incidents during Muslim holidays.

It’s now been a year, and our project is a sad and seemingly endless scroll through nearly 400 stories of Muslims in America being attacked, threatened, scapegoated, and profiled, seeing their places of worship vandalized and their faith denigrated.

An email address we set up as a source for tips — islamophobia@huffingtonpost.com — generated hundreds of responses. Many people expressed gratitude for the project. One email led to a story about a Muslim Army veteran who found the word “terrorist” written on his locker. Mostly, we received anti-Muslim hate mail.

Radical preacher Anjem Choudary jailed for five-and-a-half years

Anjem Choudary

Anjem Choudary

Radical preacher Anjem Choudary has been jailed for five-and-a-half years for inviting support for the so-called Islamic State group.

The 49-year-old was convicted at the Old Bailey after backing the group in an oath of allegiance published online.

Police say Choudary’s followers carried out attacks in the UK and abroad.

The judge, who described Choudary as calculating and dangerous, passed the same sentence on his confidant Mohammed Mizanur Rahman, 33.

Both men were also sentenced to a notification order lasting 15 years, which requires them to tell police if details such as their address change.

Choudary, of Ilford, east London, and Rahman, from Palmers Green, north London, were convicted last month of inviting support for IS – an offence contrary to section 12 of the Terrorism Act 2000 – between 29 June 2014 and 6 March 2015.

The trial heard the pair also used speeches to urge support for IS, which is also known as Daesh, after it declared a caliphate in the summer of 2014.

Video: Dr. Sari Nusseibeh provides an introduction to Islamic philosophy

Dr. Sari Nusseibeh, courtesy Bernhard Ludewig

Dr. Sari Nusseibeh, courtesy Bernhard Ludewig

Video: Dr. Sari Nusseibeh, the Palestinian diplomat and intellectual who is a Vice-President of Interlitq, provides an introduction to Islamic philosophy.

Video: Dr. Sari Nusseibeh discusses “Islam: Lawmakers and Philosophers” at Cornell University

Dr. Sari Nusseibeh, courtesy Bernhard Ludewig

Dr. Sari Nusseibeh, courtesy Bernhard Ludewig

Video: Dr. Sari Nusseibeh, the Palestinian diplomat and intellectual who is a Vice-President of Interlitq, discusses “Islam: Lawmakers and Philosophers” at Cornell University.

Linda Sarsour Is a Brooklyn Homegirl in a Hijab

Linda Sarsour at the Arab American Association of New York's annual Arab American Bazaar. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times

Linda Sarsour at the Arab American Association of New York’s annual Arab American Bazaar. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times

Behind schedule as usual, Linda Sarsour rushed into the Times Square office of the civil rights group the Gathering for Justice last month, 40 minutes late for a meeting with its founder, Harry Belafonte. On the way in from Brooklyn, the Uber driver she had hired made a wrong turn and wound up in New Jersey. Now, wearing her head scarf and hungry from fasting for Ramadan, Ms. Sarsour scurried into an auditorium packed with some of the city’s most prominent social-justice warriors.

There was just enough time for her to speed-hug friends and take a quick selfie with “Mr. B.,” as everybody called him, before he took the stage and told the assembled activists that they — the younger generation — were continuing the legacy of “Malcolm X, Fannie Lou Hamer and Dr. King.” As Mr. Belafonte sonorously spoke of how he had devoted his life and art to activism, Ms. Sarsour, already a half-hour tardy for her next event, was quietly bent over her phone, scanning Uber for the nearest available car.