Archive for the ‘Ireland’ Category

Interlitq publishes Neil Langdon Inglis’s review of Brian Inglis’s book, “Fringe Medicine”

Neil Langdon Inglis, Interlitq‘s U. S. Editor

Interlitq publishes Neil Langdon Inglis‘s review of Brian Inglis‘s book, Fringe Medicine.

Read more about Neil Langdon Inglis

Read more about Brian Inglis

Roddy Doyle, Irish novelist, dramatist and screenwriter, 60 today

Roddy Doyle

Roddy Doyle, the Irish novelist, dramatist and screenwriter, is 60 today.

About Roddy Doyle

“…patient/doctor relations were forever changed by Inglis’s efforts”

Brian Inglis

Brian Inglis (1916-1993) was neither the first nor only author to question blind obedience to doctors. Nonetheless, his controversial classic “Fringe Medicine” (1964, Faber and Faber) ushered in the modern era of patient advocacy, laying the foundations for today’s wellness movement. The author’s traversal of this field laid out options for desperate patients ill-served by conventional therapies and determined to recapture their health. How well has Inglis’s campaign withstood the test of time?
Inglis’s warnings of antibiotic resistance are remarkably prescient. In other areas he may have gone too far (the “black box,” used in the technique of radiesthesia, has faded from view). Self-censorship was never Brian’s forte, and his polemics unleashed a counter-revolution with the rise of the global skeptical movement in the 1970s.
The fact remains that patient/doctor relations were forever changed by Inglis’s efforts. Join us at interlitq.org as Brian’s son Neil Langdon Inglis reviews “Fringe Medicine,” soon to be re-released by Endeavour Media in an e-book edition.

Neil Langdon Inglis, Interlitq’s U.S. Editor, to review Brian Inglis’s book, “Fringe Medicine”

Brian Inglis

Brian Inglis (1916-1993) was neither the first nor only author to question blind obedience to doctors. Nonetheless, his controversial classic “Fringe Medicine” (1964, Faber and Faber) ushered in the modern era of patient advocacy, laying the foundations for today’s wellness movement. The author’s traversal of this field laid out options for desperate patients ill-served by conventional therapies and determined to recapture their health. How well has Inglis’s campaign withstood the test of time?
Inglis’s warnings of antibiotic resistance are remarkably prescient. In other areas he may have gone too far (the “black box,” used in the technique of radiesthesia, has faded from view). Self-censorship was never Brian’s forte, and his polemics unleashed a counter-revolution with the rise of the global skeptical movement in the 1970s.
The fact remains that patient/doctor relations were forever changed by Inglis’s efforts. Join us at interlitq.org as Brian’s son Neil Langdon Inglis reviews “Fringe Medicine,” soon to be re-released by Endeavour Media in an e-book edition.

Read more about Neil Langdon Inglis

Read more about Brian Inglis

Interlitq publishes Neil Langdon Inglis’s assessment (“Revolutionary or traitor?”) of his father’s biography of Roger Casement

Interlitq publishes Neil Langdon Inglis‘s assessment (“Revolutionary or traitor?”) of his father’s biography of Roger Casement.

Read more about Roger Casement

Read more about Neil Langdon Inglis

Read more about Brian Inglis