Archive for the ‘Ireland’ Category

Jennifer Johnston Lifetime Achievement Award/ Video

Jennifer Johnston

Jennifer Johnston

The Bord Gáis Energy Irish Book Awards is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2015 – here we have a look back at the tribute and acceptance speech for Jennifer Johnston’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012 – featuring Roddy Doyle & Donal Ryan.

“I have great admiration for the work of Mary Lavin…”: Diarmaid Ferriter

Mary Lavin: “She tackled social taboos, the dark forces of family life and the private battles to maintain a spirited defiance in the face of class prejudices and cruelties; a social reality far removed from the official image of nationalist Ireland.”

Mary Lavin: “She tackled social taboos, the dark forces of family life and the private battles to maintain a spirited defiance in the face of class prejudices and cruelties; a social reality far removed from the official image of nationalist Ireland.”

Diarmaid Ferriter writes:

I have great admiration for the work of Mary Lavin, who published her first collection of short stories, Tales from Bective Bridge, in 1942, because she did so much that decade and subsequently to skilfully map what she described as the “vagaries and contrarieties” of the human heart, especially the female heart.

She tackled social taboos, the dark forces of family life and the private battles to maintain a spirited defiance in the face of class prejudices and cruelties; a social reality far removed from the official image of nationalist Ireland.

The Long Ago (1944) deals with a girl who elopes, is rejected by her family, but refuses to bend. The Becker Wives (1946) gives us an insight into middle-class tensions and snobberies, the constant pressures to conform and the way in which those who did not were cast aside.

She also drew heavily on her own experiences and her complex psychology to delineate the conflicts of the mind; the delusions, the desires and how they are managed, but her craft was not just about depicting bleakness, as seen in The Middle of the Fields (1967), about the independence of widows, who do no wallow in grief but adapt, confront and liberate themselves.

Diarmaid Ferriter is Professor of Modern Irish History at UCD.

Brian Inglis’s “The Forbidden Game” re-released by Endeavour Press

 

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Interlitq‘s U.S. General Editor Neil Langdon Inglis wishes to announce that Endeavour Press has re-released (in Kindle form) the landmark social history of drugs written by his father, “The Forbidden Game” (originally published by Hodder & Stoughton, 1975).
Brian Inglis was an Irish broadcaster and historian based in London (1916-1993). Uneasy about the professional and critical acclaim he had enjoyed in the UK over two decades, Inglis relished the opportunity to scrutinize the British Empire’s ignominious motivations where stimulants and narcotics were concerned. In Inglis’s portrayal, Parliament has been endlessly torn between the urge to impose puritanical crackdowns and the lust for tax revenue, itself a form of addiction.  The Crown’s hypocrisy is further laid bare, given that certain stimulants (the great British cuppa among them) stimulate energy and hard work, rather than stupor and laxity, and have thus received the government’s stamp of approval.
The following year (1976), Inglis’s researches led to the publication of his epic indictment of Britain’s role in the opium trade (“The Opium War,” originally published by H&S, 1976), which is also available from Endeavour in Kindle form.
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William Trevor, novelist and short story writer, dies aged 88

Trevor's most recent novel was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize

Trevor’s most recent novel was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize

William Trevor, the Irish novelist, playwright and short story writer, has died at the age of 88, his publisher has announced.

Penguin Random House Ireland tweeted: “We regret to announce the death of William Trevor, one of Ireland’s greatest writers.”

It added: “We extend our deepest condolences to his family.”

The writer won the Whitbread Prize in 1994 and has been shortlisted four times for the Man Booker Prize.

Writer Joyce Carol Oates led the tributes to Trevor on Twitter.

“William Trevor, one of the great short story writers. Beautifully composed, lyrical, understated prose,” she wrote.

Crime novelist Sarah Hilary : “RIP William Trevor, one of my favourite authors.”

Trevor was born in Mitchelstown, County Cork, in the Republic of Ireland on 24 May 1928.

He was educated at St Columba’s College and Trinity College in Dublin before working briefly as a teacher, and later as a copywriter in an advertising agency.

Endeavour Press republishes Brian Inglis’s “The Story of Ireland”

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U.S. General Editor of Interlitq, Neil Langdon Inglis wishes to announce that his father’s history of the country of his birth, “The Story of Ireland’ (originally published by Faber and Faber in 1956) has been re-released in a Kindle edition by Endeavour Press. The London-based broadcaster and historian Brian Inglis (1916-1993) did not live to see the trends that brought about an era of prosperity for modern Ireland. Yet Inglis’s restrained but trenchant advocacy for his people perceived these trends, and lit the peaceful touchpaper for later reforms that ushered in the Celtic Tiger. Devoted to his mother country’s finer qualities, yet realistic about her faults, Inglis’s affectionate review of Irish history holds invaluable lessons for those wishing to study a country that is now far too busy to bear grudges and which punches above its weight in the worlds of culture and business.