Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Le fascisme en France – Henri Guillemin/ Audio

Henri Guillemin

Henri Guillemin

Le fascisme en France – Henri Guillemin/ Audio.

Brian Inglis’s “The Forbidden Game” re-released by Endeavour Press

 

the-forbidden-game-247x375
Interlitq‘s U.S. General Editor Neil Langdon Inglis wishes to announce that Endeavour Press has re-released (in Kindle form) the landmark social history of drugs written by his father, “The Forbidden Game” (originally published by Hodder & Stoughton, 1975).
Brian Inglis was an Irish broadcaster and historian based in London (1916-1993). Uneasy about the professional and critical acclaim he had enjoyed in the UK over two decades, Inglis relished the opportunity to scrutinize the British Empire’s ignominious motivations where stimulants and narcotics were concerned. In Inglis’s portrayal, Parliament has been endlessly torn between the urge to impose puritanical crackdowns and the lust for tax revenue, itself a form of addiction.  The Crown’s hypocrisy is further laid bare, given that certain stimulants (the great British cuppa among them) stimulate energy and hard work, rather than stupor and laxity, and have thus received the government’s stamp of approval.
The following year (1976), Inglis’s researches led to the publication of his epic indictment of Britain’s role in the opium trade (“The Opium War,” originally published by H&S, 1976), which is also available from Endeavour in Kindle form.
 414xgoik00l

Endeavour Press republishes Brian Inglis’s “The Story of Ireland”

the-story-of-ireland

U.S. General Editor of Interlitq, Neil Langdon Inglis wishes to announce that his father’s history of the country of his birth, “The Story of Ireland’ (originally published by Faber and Faber in 1956) has been re-released in a Kindle edition by Endeavour Press. The London-based broadcaster and historian Brian Inglis (1916-1993) did not live to see the trends that brought about an era of prosperity for modern Ireland. Yet Inglis’s restrained but trenchant advocacy for his people perceived these trends, and lit the peaceful touchpaper for later reforms that ushered in the Celtic Tiger. Devoted to his mother country’s finer qualities, yet realistic about her faults, Inglis’s affectionate review of Irish history holds invaluable lessons for those wishing to study a country that is now far too busy to bear grudges and which punches above its weight in the worlds of culture and business.

Vidéo: Madame du Barry seule contre tous

Madame du Barry par Francois-Hubert Drouais

Madame du Barry par Francois-Hubert Drouais

Jeanine Huas et Roger Cardon raconte l’histoire de Madame du Barry et sa relation avec le roi Louis XV.

“What kind of person questions that a historical episode actually took place?”: Neil Langdon Inglis

Neil Langdon Inglis

Neil Langdon Inglis

In his essay “Remembering Robert Conquest”, to be published in Interlitq´s “English Writers 2” feature, Neil Langdon Inglis, U. S. General Editor of Interlitq, and a contributor to Issues 18, 19, 20 and 21 of Interlitq, and Interlitq´s “English Writers 1” feature, begins:

“What kind of person questions that a historical episode actually took place?  Some 15 years ago, I stumbled upon a public lecture by Apollo denialist Ralph René who argued that the lunar landings were trick photography and nothing else.  Afterwards, I pointed out to René that cosmonauts Leonov and co., and indeed the entire Soviet space fraternity, would have monitored the Apollo flights from Baikonur; furthermore, the Soviet regime would not have passed up the propaganda opportunity afforded by such an audacious deception. Not so, Rene replied: the Americans had bought Soviet silence with much-needed grain shipments.”