Archive for the ‘Greece’ Category

Johann Winckelmann was murdered in Trieste at 50 years old on this day in history: 8 June, 1768

Johann Joachim Winckelmann

Johann Joachim Winckelmann

Johann Joachim Winckelmann (December 9, 1717 – June 8, 1768) was a German art historian and archaeologist. He was a pioneering Hellenist who first articulated the difference between Greek, Greco-Roman and Roman art. “The prophet and founding hero of modern archaeology”, Winckelmann was one of the founders of scientific archaeology and first applied the categories of style on a large, systematic basis to the history of art. Many consider him the father of the discipline of art history. His would be the decisive influence on the rise of the neoclassical movement during the late 18th century. His writings influenced not only a new science of archaeology and art history but Western painting, sculpture, literature and even philosophy. Winckelmann’s History of Ancient Art (1764) was one of the first books written in German to become a classic of European literature. His subsequent influence on Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Hölderlin, Heine, Nietzsche, George, and Spengler has been provocatively called “the Tyranny of Greece over Germany.”

Today, Humboldt University of Berlin’s Winckelmann Institute is dedicated to the study of classical archaeology.

Winckelmann was notably homosexual, and open homoeroticism informed his writings on aesthetics. This was recognized and accepted by his contemporaries, such as Goethe.

From NYC, Pen American Center presents a tribute to Constantine P. Cavafy

Constantine Cavafy c. 1900

Constantine Cavafy c. 1900

From NYC, Pen American Center presents a tribute to Constantine P. Cavafy, the Greek poet who was born on this day in history: 29 April, 1863.

Accompanied my music specially composed by Vangelus, Sean Connery reads the poem “Ithaca” by Constantine P. Cavafy

Sean Connery

Sean Connery

Accompanied my music specially composed by Vangelus, Sean Connery reads the poem “Ithaca” by Constantine P. Cavafy, the Greek poet who was born on this day in history: 29 April, 1863.

Constantine Cavafy c. 1900

Constantine Cavafy c. 1900

Constantine P. Cavafy, Greek poet, was born on this day in history: 29 April, 1863

Constantine Cavafy c. 1900

Constantine Cavafy c. 1900

Constantine P. Cavafy, Greek poet, was born on this day in history: 29 April, 1863:

Constantine P. Cavafy (/kəˈvɑːfɪ/; also known as Konstantin or Konstantinos Petrou Kavafis, or Kavaphes; Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Π. Καβάφης; April 29 (April 17, OS), 1863 – April 29, 1933) was a Greek poet who lived in Alexandria and worked as a journalist and civil servant. He published 154 poems; dozens more remained incomplete or in sketch form. His most important poetry was written after his fortieth birthday.

On this day in history: April 8, 1798, Greek poet Dionysios Solomos was born

Dionysios Solomos

Dionysios Solomos

On this day in history: April 8, 1798, Dionysios Solomos (Greek: Διονύσιος Σολωμός), Greek poet from Zakynthos, was born:

Dionysios Solomos (Greek: Διονύσιος Σολωμός; 8 April 1798 – 9 February 1857) was a Greek poet from Zakynthos. He is best known for writing the Hymn to Liberty (Greek: Ὕμνος εἰς τὴν Ἐλευθερίαν, Ýmnos eis tīn Eleutherían), of which the first two stanzas, set to music by Nikolaos Mantzaros, became the Greek national anthem in 1865. He was the central figure of the Heptanese School of poetry, and is considered the national poet of Greece—not only because he wrote the national anthem, but also because he contributed to the preservation of earlier poetic tradition and highlighted its usefulness to modern literature. Other notable poems include Ὁ Κρητικός (Τhe Cretan), Ἐλεύθεροι Πολιορκημένοι (The Free Besieged) and others. A characteristic of his work is that no poem except the Hymn to Liberty was completed, and almost nothing was published during his lifetime.