Archive for the ‘Belgium’ Category

Cómo poner fin a la guerra entre hombres y mujeres

Luce Irigaray, lingüista y psicoanalista belga, viene siendo una piedrita en el zapato para el mianstream planetario.

Este logos falo céntrico sigue funcionando como un sistema de valores simbólicos, psicológicos y antropológicos universales. Hay un gobierno masculino que está lejos de cambiar, pero, ¿qué pasaría si se instaurase un matriarcado? No es de hecho la idea de Irigaray, aunque este libro trate de establecer un genio femenino oculto y olvidado durante toda la historia de la humanidad.

Hablemos claro, el problema más urgente es “cómo vamos a afrontar el futuro”. Desde dónde estamos pensando ese futuro y con qué instrumentos, en ese sentido, la crítica de Irigaray busca “descolonizar” el conocimiento dominado hasta ahora por hombres que han excluido desde siempre a la mujer.

Desde los griegos el pensamiento-logos ha sido inventado por hombres, negando a su otra parte un rol protagónico, transformándola en una adversaria, una extranjera, un objeto oscuro de deseo (una divisa de intercambio y no de conocimiento), que es y será sin duda una de las razones de las continuas guerras por hacerse del poder.

Una manera de proteger esta supremacía y seguir adueñándose de la subjetividad femenina se da a través del ejercicio de la violencia.

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Belgian woman, 24, granted right to die by euthanasia over suicidal thoughts: ‘Life, that’s not for me’

A 24-year-old Belgium woman (not pictured) who has depression was granted the right to die even though she's not terminally ill.

A 24-year-old Belgium woman (not pictured) who has depression was granted the right to die even though she’s not terminally ill.

A 24-year-old Belgian woman who suffers from depression and has had a “death wish” since childhood has been granted the right to die  — even though she’s not terminally ill.

Doctors gave the young woman, identified only as Laura, the go-ahead to be euthanized by lethal injection after she spent her life battling suicidal thoughts, she told Belgian newspaper De Morgen.

“Life, that’s not for me,” she said. “Death feels to me not as a choice. If I had a choice, I would choose a bearable life, but I have done everything and that was unsuccessful.”

Laura, who entered a psychiatric institution when she was 21, said her alcohol father and troubled childhood contributed to her longtime “death wish.”

“I played all my life with these thoughts of suicide, I have also done a few attempts,” she said. “But then there is someone who needs me, and I don’t want to hurt anyone. That has always stopped me.”

Laura is now planning her funeral and final words to loved ones, De Morgen reported.

Hergé was born in Brussels on this day in history: 22 May, 1907

In this illustration released by the Herge Moulinsart foundation, cartoon character Tintin grabs his coat to chase after another adventure with his trusted dog Snowy in tow. Belgium increased its daily dose of Tintin to saturation point Friday, Jan.9, 2004, on the eve of the 75th birthday of the character, perhaps the country's most famous icon. (AP Photo/Herge/Moulinsart 2004) ** NO SALES , MANDATORY CREDIT ** BELGIUM TINTIN 75 2004-3109.JPG

In this illustration released by the Herge Moulinsart foundation, cartoon character Tintin grabs his coat to chase after another adventure with his trusted dog Snowy in tow. Belgium increased its daily dose of Tintin to saturation point Friday, Jan.9, 2004, on the eve of the 75th birthday of the character, perhaps the country’s most famous icon. (AP Photo/Herge/Moulinsart 2004) ** NO SALES , MANDATORY CREDIT ** BELGIUM TINTIN 75
2004-3109.JPG

Georges Prosper Remi (French: [ʁəmi]; 22 May 1907 – 3 March 1983), known by the pen name Hergé ([ɛʁʒe]), was a Belgian cartoonist. He is best known for The Adventures of Tintin, the series of comic albums which are considered one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. He was also responsible for two other well-known series, Quick & Flupke (1930–40) and Jo, Zette and Jocko (1936–57). His works were executed in his distinct ligne claire drawing style.

Born to a lower middle-class family in Etterbeek, Brussels, Hergé began his career by contributing illustrations to Scouting magazines, developing his first comic series,The Adventures of Totor, for Le Boy-Scout Belge in 1926. Working for the conservative Catholic newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle, he created The Adventures of Tintin in 1929 at the advice of its editor Norbert Wallez. Revolving around the actions of boy reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, the series’ early installments – Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, Tintin in the Congo, and Tintin in America – were designed as conservative propaganda for children. Domestically successful, after serialisation the stories were published in book form, with Hergé continuing the series and also developing both the Quick & Flupke and Jo, Zette and Jocko series for Le Vingtième Siècle. Influenced by his friend Zhang Chongren, from 1934 Hergé placed far greater emphasis on conducting background research for his stories, resulting in increased realism from The Blue Lotus onward. Following the German occupation of Belgium in 1939, Le Vingtième Siècle was closed but Hergé continued his series in Le Soir, a popular newspaper controlled by the Nazi administration.

After the Allied liberation of Belgium in 1944, Le Soir was shut down and its staff – including Hergé – accused of having been collaborators. An official investigation was launched, and while no charges were brought against Hergé, in future years he repeatedly faced accusations of having been a traitor and collaborator. With Raymond Leblanc he established Tintin magazine in 1946, through which he serialised new Adventures of Tintin stories. As the magazine’s artistic director, he also oversaw the publication of other successful comics series, such as Edgar P. JacobsBlake and Mortimer. In 1950 he established Studios Hergé as a team to aid him in his ongoing projects; prominent staff members Jacques Martin and Bob de Moor greatly contributed to subsequent volumes of The Adventures of Tintin. Amid personal turmoil following the collapse of his first marriage he produced Tintin in Tibet, his personal favourite of his works. In later years he became less prolific, and unsuccessfully attempted to establish himself as an abstract artist.

Hergé’s works have been widely acclaimed for their clarity of draughtsmanship and meticulous, well-researched plots. They have been the source of a wide range of adaptations, in theatre, radio, television, cinema, and computer gaming. He remains a strong influence on the comic book medium, particularly in Europe. Widely celebrated in Belgium, a Hergé Museum was established in Louvain-la-Neuve in 2009. His work nevertheless remains controversial, having been criticised for instances of antisemitism and racism.

“At every crossroads on the path that leads to the future tradition has placed 10 000 men to guard the past”: Maurice Maeterlinck

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According to Maurice Maeterlinck, the Belgian Nobel laureate who died today in history, 06 May, 1949:

“At every crossroads on the path that leads to the future tradition has placed 10 000 men to guard the past.”

 

Maurice Maeterlinck, Belgian Nobel laureate, died today in history: 06 May, 1949

Maurice Maeterlinck

Maurice Maeterlinck

Maurice Polydore Marie Bernard Maeterlinck (also called Comte (Count) Maeterlinck from 1932; [mo.ʁis ma.tɛʁ.lɛ̃ːk] in Belgium, [mɛ.teʁ.lɛ̃ːk] in France; 29 August 1862 – 6 May 1949) was a Belgian playwright, poet, and essayist who was a Fleming, but wrote in French. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1911 “in appreciation of his many-sided literary activities, and especially of his dramatic works, which are distinguished by a wealth of imagination and by a poetic fancy, which reveals, sometimes in the guise of a fairy tale, a deep inspiration, while in a mysterious way they appeal to the readers’ own feelings and stimulate their imaginations”. The main themes in his work are death and the meaning of life. His plays form an important part of the Symbolist movement.