Archive for the ‘Authors’ Category

Interlitq publishes “Joan of Arc Becomes the Girl Next Door” (Chapter 23) of “Three Rivers: A Memoir” by Glenna Luschei

Glenna Luschei

Interlitq publishes “Joan of Arc Becomes the Girl Next Door” (Chapter 23) of Three Rivers: A Memoir by Glenna Luschei, the U.S. author and editor and a Vice-President of Interlitq.

Read “Seahorses and Mermaids” (Chapter 25) of Three Rivers: A Memoir by Glenna Luschei.

Read “Orchids” (Chapter 21) of Three Rivers: A Memoir by Glenna Luschei.

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“Quizá Pizarnik pida que el psicoanálisis le ofrezca lo que no tiene: una fórmula de felicidad”

Alejandra Pizarnik

Marcelo Percia escribe de Alejandra Pizarnik, poeta argentina:

“Quizá Pizarnik pida que el psicoanálisis le ofrezca lo que no tiene: una fórmula de felicidad. Razones de acogida a dudas de la existencia, ahora, expresadas en primera persona de un singular en el que se celebra a sí misma. Pero también percibe, en su expectativa de sentirse mejor, una ilusión de autorreforma, una maniobra de corte y confección para forzar su coincidencia con la imagen que le gustaría alcanzar.”

Interlitq 10 years old

16.09.2017: Interlitq is 10 years old.

Yamila Musa entrevistará a Juan José Scorzelli

 

Juan José Scorzelli

Noticias de InterlitqYamila Musa, Editor de Argentina de Interlitq, entrevistará al psicoanalista argentino, Juan José Scorzelli (“Psicoanalistas argentinas” serie).

Lee la entrevista con Luis Hornstein por Yamila Musa.

Lee la entrevista con Luciano Lutereau por Yamila Musa.

Elizabeth Taylor “led a perversely mild and parochial life”

Elizabeth Taylor

Benjamin Schwarz writes:

Like Jane Austen, the writer with whom she’s most often compared, Taylor led a perversely mild and parochial life. Before she was married, she worked as a governess and a librarian. With her husband, the director of his family’s confectionery company, she had a boy and a girl (her fiction displays a remarkable ear for the speech of children and a subtle grasp of their peculiar obsessions, suspicions, and insecurities). Ensconced in an upper-middle-class Buckinghamshire village, she was fascinated and deeply comforted by the daily routine of domestic life, the details of which she gave minute attention in her fiction. “I dislike much travel or change of environment and prefer the days … to come round almost the same, week after week,” she said.