In Troilus and Criseyde, Geoffrey Chaucer “takes risks, breaks laws, invents words and enters the dark”: Lavinia Greenlaw

Lavinia Greenlaw

Lavinia Greenlaw

Writing in The Guardian in “My Hero: Geoffrey Chaucer”Lavinia Greenlaw, a Consulting Editor for Interlitq, and a Professor of Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, states that in Troilus and Criseyde, Geoffrey Chaucer “activates courtly love and complicates his characters. He casts a searching light on Troilus and listens to Criseyde. He takes risks, breaks laws, invents words and enters the dark. While going to some lengths to point out that he’s not providing any answers, he intervenes from the start,Chaucer remindings us why such works are written and what we read them for.”

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