Interlitq wishes its Muslim friends and readers a happy Eid Mubarak 2014

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Interlitq wishes its Muslim friends and readers a happy Eid Mubarak 2014.

Creating a sound sculpture inspired by Gertrude Stein, Terry Berlier says: “At first the words seem like complete gibberish, but then they start to become immersing”

The title of this piece evokes a sound-making mechanism to tune human beings and put them in harmony with one another on a global scale. Gertrude Stein’s novella Many Many Women provides the script for this sound sculpture, which consists of 242 telephone speakers—one for every country or territory in the world—wired together for form endless loops of transmission

The title of this piece evokes a sound-making mechanism to tune human beings and put them in harmony with one another on a global scale. Gertrude Stein’s novella Many Many Women provides the script for this sound sculpture, which consists of 242 telephone speakers—one for every country or territory in the world—wired together for form endless loops of transmission

Inspired by the novella, Many Many Women by  Gertrude Stein, the U.S. author who died on this day in history, 27 July, 1946, Terry Berlier used recordings of the text to create a sound sculpture, Human Tuning Fork #4, which is part of the Stanford exhibition.

“It resonated with me at the time when I was questioning everything in the world and what I was going through,” said Ms Berlier, who also identified with Stein’s sexuality and her openly gay relationship with Alice. “At first the words seem like complete gibberish, but then they start to become immersing.”

Terry Berlier

Terry Berlier

 

 

Ferenczi escribió a Groddeck que Elizabeth Severn, con quien practicó “análisis mutual”, era un “complejo y preocupante caso” (carta de 27 Julio, 1928)

A la izquierda Gizella Ferenczi. A la derecha Elizabeth Severn, analizada y alumna de Ferenczi, nombrada en las Anotaciones datadas de los años 30 como "R.N.". Instigadora y principal paciente del "análisis mutuo". También nombrada como "la reina" (en carta a Groddeck), "el genio demoníaco de Ferenczi" (por Freud). Acompañaba a Ferenczi en sus estancias en el balneario de Groddeck y también le acompañó en su viaje a España en el 28 (para no interrumpir el tratamiento).

A la izquierda Gizella Ferenczi. A la derecha Elizabeth Severn, analizada y alumna de Ferenczi, nombrada en las Anotaciones datadas de los años 30 como “R.N.”. Instigadora y principal paciente del “análisis mutuo”. También nombrada como “la reina” (en carta a Groddeck), “el genio demoníaco de Ferenczi” (por Freud). Acompañaba a Ferenczi en sus estancias en el balneario de Groddeck y también le acompañó en su viaje a España en el 28 (para no interrumpir el tratamiento).

Miguel Gutiérrez Peláez escribe en La noción ferencziana de “Orfa”:

Severn, quien aparece en el Diario clínico como R.N., comienza a analizarse con Ferenczi en 1924. Sobre ella le escribirá a Groddeck como un “complejo y preocupante caso” (carta del 27 de julio de 1928; citado por Stanton, 1990, pág. 42) y más adelante, en una carta del 21 de diciembre de 1930, dirá: “Dedico cuatro, algunas veces
cinco horas al día a mi paciente principal, ‘la Reina’ [Elizabeth Severn]. Es cansador, pero gratificante. Pienso que pronto o, al menos, no en mucho tiempo más, seré capaz de decir qué significa ‘finalizar un análisis’.

Georg Groddeck

Georg Groddeck

Gertrude Stein, U.S. author, died on this day in history: 27 July, 1946

Gertrude Stein, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1935

Gertrude Stein, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1935

Gertrude Stein (February 3, 1874 – July 27, 1946) was an American writer of novels, poetry and plays that eschewed the narrative, linear, and temporal conventions of 19th-century literature, and a fervent collector of Modernist art. She was born in West Allegheny (Pittsburgh), Pennsylvania, raised in Oakland, California, and moved to Paris in 1903, making France her home for the remainder of her life.

For some forty years, the Stein home at 27 rue de Fleurus on the Left Bank of Paris was a renowned Saturday evening gathering place for both expatriate American artists and writers and others noteworthy in the world of vanguard arts and letters, most notably Pablo Picasso. Entrée into the Stein salon was a sought-after validation, and Stein became combination mentor, critic, and guru to those who gathered around her, including Ernest Hemingway, who described the salon in A Moveable Feast.

In 1933, Stein published a kind of memoir of her Paris years, The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, written in the voice of Toklas, her life partner. The book became a literary bestseller and vaulted Stein from the relative obscurity of cult literary figure into the light of mainstream attention.

Mohammad Rezâ Šâh Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, died on this day in history: 27 July, 1980

Mohammad Rezâ Šâh Pahlavi, Shah of Iran

Mohammad Rezâ Šâh Pahlavi, Shah of Iran

Mohammad Rezâ Šâh Pahlavi (Persian: Mohamad Rezā Ŝāhh Pahlawi, [mohæmˈmæd reˈzɒː ˈʃɒːhe pæhlæˈviː]; 25 October 1919 – 27 July 1980) was the ruler of Iran (Shah of Iran) from 16 September 1941 until his overthrow by the Iranian Revolution on 11 February 1979. He took the title Šâhanšâh (“Emperor” or “King of Kings”) on 26 October 1967. He was the second and last monarch of the House of Pahlavi of the Iranian monarchy. Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi held several other titles, including that of Aryamehr (Light of the Aryans) and Bozorge Arteštârân (Head of the Warriors, Persian: Bozorg Arteŝdārān).

Mohammad Rezâ Pahlavi came to power during World War II after an Anglo-Soviet invasion forced the abdication of his father Reza Shah. During Mohammad Reza’s reign, the Iranian oil industry was briefly nationalized under the democratically elected Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh before a U.S.-backed coup d’état deposed Mosaddegh and brought back foreign oil firms, and Iran marked the anniversary of 2,500 years of continuous monarchy since the founding of the Persian Empire by Cyrus the Great. As ruler, he introduced the White Revolution, a series of economic, social and political reforms with the proclaimed intention of transforming Iran into a global power and modernizing the nation by nationalizing certain industries and granting women suffrage.

A secular Muslim, Mohammad Reza gradually lost support from the Shi’a clergy of Iran as well as the working class, particularly due to his strong policy of modernization, secularization, conflict with the traditional class of merchants known as bazaari, recognition of Israel, and corruption issues surrounding himself, his family, and the ruling elite. Various additional controversial policies were enacted, including the banning of the communist Tudeh Party, and a general suppression of political dissent by Iran’s intelligence agency, SAVAK. According to official statistics, Iran had as many as 2,200 political prisoners in 1978, a number which multiplied rapidly as a result of the revolution.

Several other factors contributed to strong opposition to the Shah among certain groups within Iran, the most notable of which were United States and UK support for his regime, clashes with Islamists and increased communist activity. By 1979, political unrest had transformed into a revolution which, on 17 January, forced him to leave Iran. Soon thereafter, the Iranian monarchy was formally abolished, and Iran was declared an Islamic republic led by Ayatollah Khomeini. Facing likely execution should he return to Iran, he died in exile in Egypt, whose President, Anwar Sadat, had granted him asylum. Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi is often called “the last Shah of Iran” as well as “the Shah of Iran” or simply “the Shah”.

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